Publications

2014
Pinker, S. (2014). Mind Games - Pop Quiz Psychology. New York Times.
Reed, L., DeScioli, P., & Pinker, S. (2014). The commitment function of angry facial expressions. Psychological Science , 25 (8), 1511-1517.
Ronen, S., Gonçalves, B., Hu, K., Vespignani, A., Pinker, S., & Hidalgo, C. (2014). Links that speak: The global language network and its association with global fame. PNAS.
Pinker, S. (2014). Passive Resistance - The active voice isn't always the best choice. The Atlantic.
Pinker, S. (2014). Why academics stink at writing. The Chronicle of Higher Education.
Thomas, K., DeScioli, P., Sultan Haque, O., & Pinker, S. (2014). The Psychology of Coordination and Common Knowledge. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 107 (4), 657-676. PDF
Pinker, S. (2014). The Source of Bad Writing. The Wall Street Journal.
Reitveld, C., Esko, T., Pinker, S., & et al,. (2014). Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using theproxy-phenotype method. PNAS. PDF
van der Lely, H. K. J., & Pinker, S. (2014). The biological basis of language: insight from developmental grammatical impairments. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. PDF
The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century
Pinker, S. (2014). The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century . New York, NY: Penguin.Abstract

Why is so much writing so bad, and how can we make it better? Do people write badly on purpose, to bamboozle their readers with highfalutin gobbledygook? Is the English language being corrupted by texting and social media? Should we bring back the lost art of diagramming sentences? Have dictionaries abandoned their responsibility to safeguard correct usage? Do the kids today even care about good writing? Why should any of us care?

In this entertaining and instructive book, the bestselling cognitive scientist, linguist, and writer Steven Pinker rethinks the usage guide for the 21st century. Rather than moaning about the decline of the language, carping over pet peeves, or recycling spurious edicts from the rulebooks of a century ago, he applies insights from the sciences of language and mind to the challenge of crafting clear, coherent, and stylish prose.

Don’t blame the Internet, he says, or the kids today; good writing has always been hard. It begins with savoring the good prose of others. It requires an act of imagination: maintaining the illusion that one is directing a reader’s gaze to something in the world. A writer must overcome the Curse of Knowledge—the difficulty we all have in imagining what it’s like not to know something we know. Skillful writers must be sensitive to the ways in which syntax converts a tangled web of ideas into a linear string of words. They must weave their prose into a coherent whole, with one sentence flowing into the next. And they must negotiate the rules of correct usage, distinguishing the rules that enhance clarity and grace from the myths and superstitions (and thus should not be afraid to boldly split their infinitives).    

Filled with examples of great and gruesome modern prose, and avoiding the scolding tone and Spartan tastes of the classic manuals, Pinker shows how the art of writing can be a form of pleasurable mastery and a fascinating intellectual topic in its own right. The Sense of Style is for writers of all kinds, and for readers who are interested in letters and literature and curious about the ways in which the sciences of mind can illuminate how language works at its best.

REVIEWS & FEATURES
Review Excerpts
Reviews and Feature Articles

AVAILABLE AT:
Amazon
Amazon UK
Barnes & Noble
IndieBound

 

2013
Pinker, S., & Wiestier, L. (2013). Science vs. the Humanities Round III. New Republic.
Pinker, S. (2013). Science is not your enemy. New Republic.
Gleditsch, N. P., Pinker, S., Thayer, B. A., Levy, J. S., & Thompson, W. R. (2013). The Forum: The Decline of War. International Studies Review , 15, 396-419. PDF
Pinker, S. (2013). Obituaries - George A. Miller. American Psychologist , 68 (6), 467-468.
Language, Cognition, and Human Nature: Selected Articles
Pinker, S. (2013). Language, Cognition, and Human Nature: Selected Articles . New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Abstract

Language, Cognition, and Human Nature collects together for the first time much of Steven Pinker's most influential scholarly work on language and cognition. Pinker's seminal research explores the workings of language and its connections to cognition, perception, social relationships, child development, human evolution, and theories of human nature.

This eclectic collection spans Pinker's thirty-year career, exploring his favorite themes in greater depth and scientific detail. It includes thirteen of Pinker's classic articles, ranging over topics such as language development in children, mental imagery, the recognition of shapes, the computational architecture of the mind, the meaning and uses of verbs, the evolution of language and cognition, the nature-nurture debate, and the logic of innuendo and euphemism. Each outlines a major theory or takes up an argument with another prominent scholar, such as Stephen Jay Gould, Noam Chomsky, or Richard Dawkins. Featuring a new introduction by Pinker that discusses his books and scholarly work, this collection reflects essential contributions to cognitive science by one of our leading thinkers and public intellectuals.

REVIEWS

  • "Pinker is an intellectual giant in the field, one of the most important psychologists and thinkers in our day. This compilation is outstanding, a fitting crown on his career so far, although I suspect he has much more to contribute. Even though I'd read a handful of these papers before, there were some that I was unaware of that are gems. Even those I'd read before, I re-read, and got even more on the second reading." -- David Buss, author of Evolutionary Psychology: The New Science of the Mind
  • "With wit and acumen, Pinker introduces us to some of his most important scientific contributions. These glimpses into the development of these foundational articles and of course the articles themselves will be of great interest to academics and to his many fans beyond the walls of academia." -- David C. Geary, author of Male, Female: The Evolution of Human Sex Difference
  • A Pinker View of Almost Everything - Michael Corballis

AVAILABLE AT:
Amazon
Amazon UK
Barnes & Noble
IndieBound

Chabris, C. F., Lee, J. J., Benjamin, D. J., Beauchamp, J. P., Glaeser, E. L., Borst, G., Pinker, S., et al. (2013). Why It Is Hard to Find Genes Associated With Social Science Traits: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations. American Journal of Public Health , 103 (No. S1), 152-166.
Pinker, S. (2013). "The Decline of War and Conceptions of Human Nature" in The Forum: The Decline of War. International Studies Review , 15 (3), 400-405.
Learnability and Cognition: The Acquisition of Argument Structure
Pinker, S. (2013). Learnability and Cognition: The Acquisition of Argument Structure (New Edition.) . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Abstract

Before Steven Pinker wrote bestsellers on language and human nature, he wrote several technical monographs on language acquisition that have become classics in cognitive science. Learnability and Cognition, first published in 1989, brought together two big topics: how do children learn their mother tongue, and how does the mind represent basic categories of meaning such as space, time, causality, agency, and goals? The stage for this synthesis was set by the fact that when children learn a language, they come to make surprisingly subtle distinctions: pour water into the glass and fill the glass with water sound natural, but pour the glass with water and fill water into the glass sound odd. How can this happen, given that children are not reliably corrected for uttering odd sentences, and they don’t just parrot back the correct ones they hear from their parents? Pinker resolves this paradox with a theory of how children acquire the meaning and uses of verbs, and explores that theory’s implications for language, thought, and the relationship between them.

As Pinker writes in a new preface, “The Secret Life of Verbs,” the phenomena and ideas he explored in this book inspired his 2007 bestseller The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature. These technical discussions, he notes, provide insight not just into language acquisition but into literary metaphor, scientific understanding, political discourse, and even the conceptions of sexuality that go into obscenity.

REVIEWS

  • “A monumental study that sets a new standard for work on learnability.”—Ray Jackendoff, Tufts University
  • “The author's arguments are never less than impressive, and sometimes irresistible, such is the force and panache with which they are deployed.”—Paul Fletcher, Times Higher Education Supplement
  • Learnability and Cognition is theoretically a big advance, beautifully reasoned, and a goldmine of information.”—Lila Gleitman, University of Pennsylvania

AVAILABLE AT
Amazon
Amazon UK
Barnes & Noble
IndieBound

Pages