Publications

2011
The Better Angels of our Nature
Pinker, S. (2011). The Better Angels of our Nature. New York, NY: Viking.Abstract
"A brilliant, mind-altering book....Everyone should read this astonishing book."-The Guardian We’ve all had the experience of reading about a bloody war or shocking crime and asking, “What is the world coming to?” But we seldom ask, “How bad was the world in the past?” In this startling new book, the bestselling cognitive scientist Steven Pinker shows that the world of the past was much worse. With the help of more than a hundred graphs and maps, Pinker presents some astonishing numbers. Tribal warfare was nine times as deadly as war and genocide in the 20th century. The murder rate of Medieval Europe was more than thirty times what it is today. Slavery, sadistic punishments, and frivolous executions were unexceptionable features of life for millennia, then suddenly were targeted for abolition.  Wars between developed countries have vanished, and even in the developing world, wars kill a fraction of the people they did a few decades ago. Rape, battering, hate crimes, deadly riots, child abuse, cruelty to animals—all substantially down. How could this have happened, if human nature has not changed? What led people to stop sacrificing children, stabbing each other at the dinner table, or burning cats and disemboweling criminals as forms of popular entertainment? The key to explaining the decline of violence, Pinker argues, is to understand the inner demons that incline us toward violence (such as revenge, sadism, and tribalism) and the better angels that steer us away. Thanks to the spread of government, literacy, trade, and cosmopolitanism, we increasingly control our impulses, empathize with others, bargain rather than plunder, debunk toxic ideologies, and deploy our powers of reason to reduce the temptations of violence. With the panache and intellectual zeal that have made his earlier books international bestsellers and literary classics,  Pinker will force you to rethink your deepest beliefs about progress, modernity, and human nature. This gripping book is sure to be among the most debated of the century so far. REVIEWS & FEATURESReview ExcerptsFull ReviewsArticles about the Book and AuthorInterviews and Adaptations by the AuthorFrequently Asked QuestionsHas the Decline of Violence Reversed since The Better Angels of Our Nature was Written? UPDATE: New article on post-Angels trends in violenceMiscellaneous AVAILABLE AT:AmazonAmazon UKBarnes & NobleIndieBound  
Michel, J. - B., Shen, Y. K., Aiden, A. P., Veres, A., Gray, M. K., Team, T. G. B., Pickett, J. P., et al. (2011).

Quantitative analysis of culture using millions of digitized books

. Science, 331, 176-182.Abstract
We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of ‘culturomics,’ focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. Culturomics extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities.
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2010
Pinker, S. (2010). Mind over Mass Media. New York Times, A31. Full Text.
Huang, Y. - T., & Pinker, S. (2010). Lexical semantics and irregular inflection. Language and Cognitive Processes, 25, 1-51. PDF
Lee, J. J., & Pinker, S. (2010). Rationales for indirect speech: The theory of the strategic speaker. Psychological Review, 117(3), 785-807.Abstract
Speakers often do not state requests directly but employ innuendos such as Would you like to see my etchings? Though such indirectness seems puzzlingly inefficient, it can be explained by a theory of the strategic speaker, who seeks plausible deniability when he or she is uncertain of whether the hearer is cooperative or antagonistic. A paradigm case is bribing a policeman who may be corrupt or honest: A veiled bribe may be accepted by the former and ignored by the latter. Everyday social interactions can have a similar payoff structure (with emotional rather than legal penalties) whenever a request is implicitly forbidden by the relational model holding between speaker and hearer (e.g., bribing an honest maitre d’, where the reciprocity of the bribe clashes with his authority). Even when a hearer’s willingness is known, indirect speech offers higher-order plausible deniability by preempting certainty, gossip, and common knowledge of the request. In supporting experiments, participants judged the intentions and reactions of characters in scenarios that involved fraught requests varying in politeness and directness.
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Pinker, S. (2010).

The cognitive niche: Coevolution of intelligence, sociality, and language

. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107, 8893-8999. PDF
2009
Pinker, S. (2009). Malcolm Gladwell, Eclectic Detective. New York Times, BR1. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2009). Oaf of Office. New York Times, A33. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2009). My Genome, Myself. New York Times Sunday Magazine, MM24. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2009). Think Again. Playboy. PDF
Sahin, N. T., Pinker, S., Cash, S. S., Schomer, D., & Halgren, E. (2009).

Sequential Processing of Lexical, Grammatical, and Phonological Information Within Broca’s Area

. Science, 326, , 326(5951), 445-449.Abstract
Words, grammar, and phonology are linguistically distinct, yet their neural substrates are difficult to distinguish in macroscopic brain regions. We investigated whether they can be separated in time and space at the circuit level using intracranial electrophysiology (ICE), namely by recording local field potentials from populations of neurons using electrodes implanted in language-related brain regions while people read words verbatim or grammatically inflected them (present/past or singular/plural). Neighboring probes within Broca’s area revealed distinct neuronal activity for lexical (~200 milliseconds), grammatical (~320 milliseconds), and phonological (~450 milliseconds) processing, identically for nouns and verbs, in a region activated in the same patients and task in functional magnetic resonance imaging. This suggests that a linguistic processing sequence predicted on computational grounds is implemented in the brain in fine-grained spatiotemporally patterned activity.
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2008
Pinker, S. (2008). Everything You Heard is Wrong. New York Times, A19. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2008). Crazy Love. Time. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2008). Freedom's Curse: Why Washington's Crusade Against Swearing on the Airwaves is F*cked Up. The Atlantic, 4-5. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2008). High Five: My Five Favorite Cartoon Characters. Forbes. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2008). A Life in Books. Newsweek. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2008). The Moral Instinct. New York Times Sunday Magazine. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2008). On My Mind: Steven Pinker on Swearing and Violence. Seed. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2008). Steven Pinker on Al Bregman. New York Times Magazine. Full Text.
Pinker, S. (2008). The Stupidity of Dignity. The New Republic. Full Text.